Our Story


We are a Sydney-based blade sharpening company that is passionate and skilled with sharpening an array of metal ware including all manner of knives, hunting and combat blades and also domestic and commercial tools. We are proud to provide our knife sharpening services to both the individual and the business dependent on their blade sharpening needs. Here at Blade and Stone we endeavour to educate the public on the truths about man’s oldest tool. Whether your blade is for the kitchen, the butchery, the hunter, skinner or serving modern combat soldier we know how to give you the best and sharpest edge wholly dependent on each individual blades’ needs.

Our Story


We are a Sydney-based blade sharpening company that is passionate and skilled with sharpening an array of metal ware including all manner of knives, hunting and combat blades and also domestic and commercial tools. We are proud to provide our services to both the individual and the business dependant on their blade sharpening needs. Here at Blade and Stone we endeavour to educate the public on the truths about man’s oldest tool. Whether your blade is for the kitchen, the butchery, the hunter, skinner or serving modern combat soldier we know how to give you the best and sharpest edge wholly dependent on each individual blades’ needs.

Our Practices


At Blade and Stone we are very particular about which sharpening stones we use. We only use cold water stones and oil stone finishing to maintain a blade's true integrity and sharpness. We use a combination of slow grinding water wheels, Japanese water stones and Arkansas oil stones, finishing on various grades of leather to polish a blade to a mirror finish.

Our Practices


At Blade and Stone we are very particular about which sharpening stones we use. We only use cold water stones and oil stone finishing to maintain a blade's true integrity and sharpness. We use a combination of slow grinding water wheels, Japanese water stones and Arkansas oil stones, finishing on various grades of leather to polish a blade to a mirror finish.







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Every Blade is Different


Different steel, forging methods, profile, bevelling and practical use are born out of every unique blade. An edge on a single bevel Kataba style sashimi knife is completely different and must be sharpened in opposing ways by hand to a dagger or spear used for thrusting in hunting or armed combat. A carbon steel blade must be cared for and maintained very differently to most forms of stainless steel alloy blades of all different denominations. Most chefs, butchers, hunters and other blade aficionado’s, through no fault of their own, have been repeatedly misled, lied too and led astray by spurious claims and charlatans that claim they have the cheap and quick fix answer to maintaining their blade's edge, regardless of its use. This is plain false marketing tactics that prey on people’s lack of knowledge of man's oldest tool

Every Blade is Different


Different steel, forging methods, profile, bevelling and practical use are born out of every unique blade. An edge on a single bevel Kataba style sashimi knife is completely different and must be sharpened in opposing ways by hand to a dagger or spear used for thrusting in hunting or armed combat. A carbon steel blade must be cared for and maintained very differently to most forms of stainless steel alloy blades of all different denominations. Most chefs, butchers, hunters and other blade aficionado’s through no fault of their own have been repeatedly misled, lied too and led astray by spurious claims and charlatans that claim they have the cheap and quick fix answer to maintaining their blades edge, regardless of its use. This is plain false marketing tactics that prey on people’s lack of knowledge of mans oldest tool. 

Blade Misconceptions


There are many misconceptions about blades that the public have come to believe through no fault of their own. Many businesses in the blade sharpening world have preyed on the lack of education around blades and how they must be properly maintained. Here are some of the worst.

Blade Misconceptions


There are many misconceptions about blades that the public have come to believe through no fault of their own. Many businesses in the blade sharpening world have preyed on the lack of education around blades and how they must be properly maintained. Here for you are some of the worst.

‘Diamond’ and ‘Bastard’ Honing Steels are okay to use: FALSE

Once again this is one of the most commonly misunderstood pieces of blade sharpening gear. In some circumstances delicate ceramic steels can be used on occasion to gently “HONE”. Simply all blade edges have teeth, it just depends how fine this tooth pattern is and what angle it has been ground onto the blade. Think of all blade edges like “a used toothbrush” with blades teeth or “bristles” that slowly splay out over time through natural use and attrition. “Sharpening” is grinding new teeth onto the blade with stone. Honing” is re-aligning the existing teeth, usually on a fine ceramic steel or leather strop to push the existing teeth back together into a fine pattern giving the “illusion” that you have just sharpened your blade. All blade edges regardless of their make will naturally dull over time through regular use. Eventually the existing teeth deteriorate and you are left with no edge. Diamond” and “Bastard” steels absolutely destroy the hard work that goes into putting a fine edge on a blade with various grades of stone by ripping the teeth off and leaving a rough jagged edge that may cut for a short period, but in reality is like sawing at your product with broken glass.




All blade sharpeners abide
by a code of practice: FALSE

In Australia, unlike Japan, there is no
over reaching or certifying body of trade practices when it comes to professional blade sharpening and maintenance. Therefore operators who make all types of
false claims without any governance or authority leave the door open for exploitation.

'Pull-through' sharpeners are good: FALSE

They are dangerous and gouge a horribly coarse edge through the middle of a blade missing the vital tip and heel. Not only do they do this but also they remove way too much steel from your blade. Also you are left with metal filings that can potentially be consumed orally if it is being used on a culinary blade. ”Pull Through” Knife sharpeners should never be used under any circumstance.




'Hot grinders' are okay to use: FALSE

We have bench grinders and linishers to use “Exclusively” to remove heavy amounts of metal for repair to combat blades, axes and hatchets etc. Also on occasion to remove the bolsters on western style chefs knives that become a burden with age. The difference is we use iced water and never, ever heat the blade. All quality blades are “quenched” in water, oil or occasionally lead to give a uniform metallurgic molecular pattern to the alloy once forging is complete. Once this process is done, it is then imperative that the blades temporal structure is unchanged. Hot grinding and superheating parts of a blades edge leave “hot spots” on an edge, create brittleness and overall, destroy the blade's edge permanently.

‘Diamond’ and ‘Bastard’ Honing Steels are okay to use: FALSE

Once again this is one of the most commonly misunderstood pieces of blade sharpening gear. In some circumstances delicate ceramic steels can be used on occasion to gently “HONE”. Simply all blade edges have teeth, it just depends how fine this tooth pattern is and what angle it has been ground onto the blade. Think of all blade edges like “a used toothbrush” with blades teeth or “bristles” that slowly splay out over time through natural use and attrition. “Sharpening” is grinding new teeth onto the blade with stone. Honing” is re-aligning the existing teeth, usually on a fine ceramic steel or leather strop to push the existing teeth back together into a fine pattern giving the “illusion” that you have just sharpened your blade. All blade edges regardless of their make will naturally dull over time through regular use. Eventually the existing teeth deteriorate and you are left with no edge. Diamond” and “Bastard” steels absolutely destroy the hard work that goes into putting a fine edge on a blade with various grades of stone by ripping the teeth off and leaving a rough jagged edge that may cut for a short period, but in reality is like sawing at your product with broken glass.

All blade sharpeners abide by a code of practice: FALSE

In Australia, unlike Japan, there is no over reaching or certifying body of trade practices when it comes to professional blade sharpening and maintenance. Therefore operators who make all types of false claims without any governance or authority leave the door open for exploitation.

'Pull-through' sharpeners are good: FALSE

They are dangerous and gouge a horribly coarse edge through the middle of a blade missing the vital tip and heel. Not only do they do this but also they remove way too much steel from your blade. Also you are left with metal filings that can potentially be consumed orally if it is being used on a culinary blade. ”Pull Through” Knife sharpeners should never be used under any circumstance. Many people have then asked me, “well why do they sell them them?." My response is simple, just like a big tobacco company they want your money and don’t care about you or your circumstances.

'Hot grinders' are okay to use: FALSE

A lot of cowboy and rouge operators use super fast spinning bench grinders, or linishers often on the back of some motorbike. They have no idea what they are doing and if they did then they are complicit in your blades temporal destruction. We do have bench grinders and linishers to use “Exclusively” to remove heavy amounts of metal for repair to combat blades, axes and hatchets etc. Also on occasion to remove the bolsters on western style chefs knives that become a burden with age. The difference is we use iced water and never, ever heat the blade. All quality blades are “quenched” in water, oil or occasionally lead to give a uniform metallurgic molecular pattern to the alloy once forging is complete. Once this process is done, it is then imperative that the blades temporal structure is unchanged. Hot grinding and superheating parts of a blades edge leave “hot spots” on an edge, create brittleness and overall, destroy the blades edge permanently.